Illegitimus non carborundum

Illegitimus non carborundum


Bill Clark was Ronald Reagan's single most trusted aide, perhaps the most powerful national security advisor in American history. As this book shows, Ronald Reagan and Bill Clark, two ranchers, a president and his top hand, truly changed history. And why did Clark not write that story as everyone--from top Reagan officials such as Cap Weinberger to authoritative Reagan biographers such as Lou Cannon--urged him to do so? Clark, known to many as simply The Judge. Paul Kengor did the convincing, and Pat Clark Doerner worked with Clark to painstakingly review the manuscript--after Kengor and Doerner together wrote this fascinating account of one man's life, from a ranch house to the White House and then, again, back to the ranch--to what Ronald Reagan called the "sunset of life. Instead, at long last, he acquiesced to the writing of this biography. At long last, over two decades after that significant accomplishment, Bill Clark shares the details of that extraordinary effort, many of which--as readers of this book will learn--have never been reported. It was Clark who turned Reagan around on the abortion issue. With Reagan, Clark accomplished many things, but none more profound than the track they laid to undermine Soviet communism, to win the Cold War. Bill Clark's reluctance to promote himself stopped him from picking up pen and paper. Why did he never write memoirs, even while less influential advisers advanced their stories in the s, proclaiming theirs to be the authoritative "insider's account" of the Reagan presidency? With his record, resume, and the respect he earned from so many quarters, why did Bill Clark never pen an autobiography? Includes 32 pages of photos, in black and white and color. Clark's strong Catholicism is the rock of his whole life, and Reagan recognized and deeply respected that. The reason Reagan had such trust in Clark was because Clark was a devout, orthodox, staunch Catholic who always put his faith first in life. His close relationship with Reagan allows special insight into the President as well as other close friends from the earliest Reagan years:

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Illegitimus non carborundum

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With Reagan, Clark accomplished many things, but none more profound than the track they laid to undermine Soviet communism, to win the Cold War. Includes 32 pages of photos, in black and white and color. Bill Clark was Ronald Reagan's single most trusted aide, perhaps the most powerful national security advisor in American history. The reason Reagan had such trust in Clark was because Clark was a devout, orthodox, staunch Catholic who always put his faith first in life. Bill Clark's reluctance to promote himself stopped him from picking up pen and paper. With his record, resume, and the respect he earned from so many quarters, why did Bill Clark never pen an autobiography? At long last, over two decades after that significant accomplishment, Bill Clark shares the details of that extraordinary effort, many of which--as readers of this book will learn--have never been reported. Paul Kengor did the convincing, and Pat Clark Doerner worked with Clark to painstakingly review the manuscript--after Kengor and Doerner together wrote this fascinating account of one man's life, from a ranch house to the White House and then, again, back to the ranch--to what Ronald Reagan called the "sunset of life. It was Clark who turned Reagan around on the abortion issue. Clark, known to many as simply The Judge. Why did he never write memoirs, even while less influential advisers advanced their stories in the s, proclaiming theirs to be the authoritative "insider's account" of the Reagan presidency? Instead, at long last, he acquiesced to the writing of this biography. Clark's strong Catholicism is the rock of his whole life, and Reagan recognized and deeply respected that. His close relationship with Reagan allows special insight into the President as well as other close friends from the earliest Reagan years: As this book shows, Ronald Reagan and Bill Clark, two ranchers, a president and his top hand, truly changed history. And why did Clark not write that story as everyone--from top Reagan officials such as Cap Weinberger to authoritative Reagan biographers such as Lou Cannon--urged him to do so?

Illegitimus non carborundum


Bill Clark was Ronald Reagan's single most trusted aide, perhaps the most powerful national security advisor in American history. As this book shows, Ronald Reagan and Bill Clark, two ranchers, a president and his top hand, truly changed history. And why did Clark not write that story as everyone--from top Reagan officials such as Cap Weinberger to authoritative Reagan biographers such as Lou Cannon--urged him to do so? Clark, known to many as simply The Judge. Paul Kengor did the convincing, and Pat Clark Doerner worked with Clark to painstakingly review the manuscript--after Kengor and Doerner together wrote this fascinating account of one man's life, from a ranch house to the White House and then, again, back to the ranch--to what Ronald Reagan called the "sunset of life. Instead, at long last, he acquiesced to the writing of this biography. At long last, over two decades after that significant accomplishment, Bill Clark shares the details of that extraordinary effort, many of which--as readers of this book will learn--have never been reported. It was Clark who turned Reagan around on the abortion issue. With Reagan, Clark accomplished many things, but none more profound than the track they laid to undermine Soviet communism, to win the Cold War. Bill Clark's reluctance to promote himself stopped him from picking up pen and paper. Why did he never write memoirs, even while less influential advisers advanced their stories in the s, proclaiming theirs to be the authoritative "insider's account" of the Reagan presidency? With his record, resume, and the respect he earned from so many quarters, why did Bill Clark never pen an autobiography? Includes 32 pages of photos, in black and white and color. Clark's strong Catholicism is the rock of his whole life, and Reagan recognized and deeply respected that. The reason Reagan had such trust in Clark was because Clark was a devout, orthodox, staunch Catholic who always put his faith first in life. His close relationship with Reagan allows special insight into the President as well as other close friends from the earliest Reagan years:

Illegitimus non carborundum


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2 thoughts on “Illegitimus non carborundum

  1. As this book shows, Ronald Reagan and Bill Clark, two ranchers, a president and his top hand, truly changed history.

  2. As this book shows, Ronald Reagan and Bill Clark, two ranchers, a president and his top hand, truly changed history. And why did Clark not write that story as everyone--from top Reagan officials such as Cap Weinberger to authoritative Reagan biographers such as Lou Cannon--urged him to do so?

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